Change of Address Checklist for Hertford Property Owners

A two-minute read.

As if selling your home, packing your belongings, and remembering to take the dog isn’t stressful enough, unfortunately, you can’t escape the paperwork palaver that comes with moving. Notifying companies and authorities of your change of address can be monotonous, but (for some things), it’s mandatory. (Not to mention the risk of being deleted from Aunty Marge’s Christmas card list if you forget to tell her you’ve moved.)

To make your life easier, we’ve compiled a handy A to Z guide of who you need to notify.

A is for Animal Care (and includes your pet’s usual vet, groomer and if you use one, dog walker).

B is for Banks, Building Societies,and Broadband.

C is for Council, Clubs, and Cable/Satellite.

D is for Doctor, Dentist, DVLA, and DWP (if you receive money from the government).

E is for your Electricity Supplier (don’t forget to read the meter!) and the Electoral Roll.

F is for your Friends and Family.

G is for your Gas Supplier and Gym membership (or cancel your membership if you’re moving out of the area).

H is for HMRC.(We wish they didn’t know where we lived, either.)

I is for Insurance – House, Car, Business, Life, Pet, Travel, and Health. (You need to insure your new property from the completion date.)

J is for Job.

K is for the Kids’ School(s).

L is for Loyalty Cards and Loan Companies.

M is for your friendly Milkman and the Microchip Database for your pet(s).

N is for Newsagent for your paper deliveries.

O is for Optician and Online Shopping. (Where would we be without internet shopping?!)

P is for Premium Bonds and your Pension Investment Company.

Q is for Quick Food2Go. Imagine when you realise your takeaway’s been delivered to your old address?

R is for Royal Mail Redirect service. You can opt for your mail to be redirected for 3, 6, or 12 months.

S is for Subscriptions, Share Registrars and Services (if you have an accountant, solicitor, gardener, window cleaner or house cleaner).

T is for your Telephone Provider (mobile and landline) and TV Licence.

U is for Utilities and University.

V is for Vehicle Breakdown Cover and Vehicle Logbook

W is for Water Supplier.

X is for X Marks the Spot. Update your address for ‘Home’ on your car’s sat nav.

Y is for Your Buyer. It’s sensible to leave a forwarding address at your old property in case you’ve missed something.

Z is for the Zoo (or anywhere else where you might have an annual membership).

For more tips and advice about how to prepare for a property move in Hertford (or if you can add to this list), give us a call on 01992 532 222.

COPYRIGHT Abel 2021

How to Help Elderly Relatives Move Home in Hertford

A three-minute read.

For an elderly relative, moving on to the next chapter of their lives can be an emotional experience. The need to move home might stem from financial needs, bereavement, health reasons, or the wish to be nearer loved ones. But whatever the catalyst, time, diplomacy, and tact are the order of the day.

Don’t rush

It’s essential to broach the subject of a move sensitively. A move in the twilight years is likely to be a final move, so it’s important to think carefully about future needs. Consider one-level living, a spare room for live-in help, and proximity to local amenities and GPs.

Size matters

For 99% of elderly homeowners, the next home is likely to be smaller than their existing home (and for some, significantly so). Prioritise the essentials in terms of furniture and belongings, being mindful of what will fit in the new home.

Clear the loft

Try to avoid simply moving the contents of one loft to another. If you can, digitise old photos and upload keepsakes to a digital photo frame. Reminders of fond memories can make a new property quickly feel like ‘home’. Shred bank statements and other unneeded paperwork to avoid any risk of identity theft.

Be respectful

When it comes to letting things go, try to help your relative make their own decisions rather than substituting your own. While you may think that their Encyclopaedia Britannica collection is ready for the skip, it may be cherished by your relative. It may be less painful for them to see treasured items go to family, friends, or their chosen charity, rather than auctioned off on eBay.

Have fun

Getting the whole family involved can help make sorting out belongings a more enjoyable experience. If you can, have a photo slideshow scrolling while you work, play your relative’s favourite music, and reward your efforts with a family meal at the end of the day.

Enlist experienced experts

On moving day itself, consider choosing a removal firm experienced in helping elderly people move home. A packing and unpacking service can lessen the load and help make your relative feel settled more quickly.

We’ve been helping elderly Hertford property owners move home for 5 years; we understand the importance of treating seniors with care and respect.

For more advice on helping an elderly relative with their next property move, contact us here at Abel.

COPYRIGHT Abel 2021

How to Avoid Time Wasters When Selling Your Hertford Home

In this two-minute read, we look at ways sellers can identify genuine buyers.

With demand currently outstripping supply in the housing market, sellers are in the driver’s seat, but there is still one hazard that could derail a sale: the flaky buyer.

In a hot market, it’s not uncommon for panicky buyers to make an impulsive offer or go beyond their financial limits.

A buyer might do this because they fear that prices are rising and the market is getting away from them. Or perhaps they’ve been outbid in the past and don’t want to lose out again.

Whatever the motivation, the result is the same: the buyer isn’t committed and drops out weeks or months into the sales process.

Not only is it frustrating for the seller but it could also cost them financially if they’re part of a chain which then collapses because the parties involved grow impatient.

Here are some tips to help you identify genuine buyers.

–  Arrange a second viewing. If the buyer makes an offer after the first viewing, your agent should arrange a second visit to see if they are still as keen as mustard. The buyer should be quizzed about their plans for the property to see if they’ve thought through the purchase.

–  Do the admin. Ensure your agent gets the buyer to fill in an offer form that includes details about their mortgage provider and solicitor. It’s preferable to go with a buyer who already has their ducks in a row.

– What’s the story? Chat to the buyer about why they are moving. If they’re expecting a baby and have family in the same street, it’s a fair bet that they’re the real deal. If they know little about the area or their story keeps changing, question if they are committed to the sale.

Ensure the lines of communication are open. Ideally, your buyer will keep you informed of their progress on the survey, searches, and chasing solicitors. Be wary if things go quiet quickly.

– Work with an experienced agent. Even though it’s a buyer’s market, a good agent can streamline the process for you. They’ll be good at spotting the genuine buyers from the chancers.

For more advice about selling your home, contact us here at Abel.

COPYRIGHT Abel 2021